The Call of the Wild by Jack London

So this story takes place in Alaska so it might not be the best summer read, unless you’re very overheated and want to pretend your brain is frozen.

IMG_5795

“Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to plunge in to the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did her wonder where or why, the call sounding imperiously, deep in the forest.”-pg. 57

The Call of the Wild tells the story of Buck, removed from his cushy life in California, and finds himself sold into the dog sled life.  He experiences the difficulty of working his way to the lead of the pack and surviving the harsh weather conditions and owners.

Written by the same author of White Fang, Jack London expertly captures struggle to survive in the cold Alaskan air during the Gold Rush from the perspective of a sled dog.   Compared to the first book I read by Jack London, I liked this one from the get go.  Read more about that review here!  The story keeps moving in a short and concise way, while still touching on the importance of the heritage of wolves and dogs share.  If you are a fan of Jack London, or just enjoy dogs and the outdoors, you will enjoy this book.

 

 

White Fang by Jack London

IMG_5728

I was recommended to read this book by my smart and handsome husband.  It’s a rare read that really shifts your perspective on the world.  I’ll admit that I found it a bit difficult at times to get into the book, but I’m really glad I read it.  Plus, now I understand Leslie Knope’s obsession with Jack London.

White Fang is the title of the novel as well as the name of the main character.  The story starts with his mother, Kiche, whose origins are part wolf and part dog. She belonged to a group of Indians, but deserted them during a famine.  We get a front row seat to White Fang’s puppy and adolescent years when he figures out the laws of nature and then man’s laws.  His life is full of heartbreak and love, and the ending makes the long story worth the read.

The back story is important, but I found it a bit cumbersome to get through.  While it did help to explain White Fang’s personality and round out the story, I think it could’ve been streamlined a bit.  I did really enjoy the last 100 pages or so the most.  Everyone who is considering owning a dog should have to read this book to understand their mannerisms.  I took this book on a recent camping trip and my sister’s puppy was there.  It was really interesting to read about possibly what could be going on in her head when she’s interacting with nature and how necessary it is for an owner to gain the trust of their dog.